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"Ozzispot Dalmatians"

*Home Of Australia's Most Titled Gr & Sup Champion Dalmatians*

 

 
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AUSTRALIAN BREED STANDARD AND EXTENSION

FAULTS

    BLUE EYES, PATCHES, BLACK AND LIVER SPOTS ON THE SAME DOG (TRICOLOURS), LEMON SPOTS, BRONZING AND OTHER FAULTS OF PIGMENTATION.

    Blue eyes, patches, tri-colours and lemon spots highly undesirable.

    Patches, Dalmatian pups are born pure white, although shadows of spots may be seen on the skin at birth. A patch is clearly visible at birth and usually found on the ear or face. A patch is an area of solid colour, a rich deep black or liver, usually with a velvety texture. It is sharply defined with an absence of white hairs. To determine between a solidly marked ear and a patch, turn the ear over to see if there are any white hairs. The presence of white hair, no matter how small an amount, would indicate a solidly marked ear. Tri-colours, a black spotted tri-colour is a dog with black spots and tan/brown spots. A liver spotted tri-colour has liver brown spots and light orange or lemon spots. The tri-colour spots generally appear on the front of the neck, chest, inside legs or around the vent.

    Lemon/orange spotting. Lemons have black nose and eyerim pigment, where oranges have brown nose and eyerim pigment. Black and liver spotting are the only acceptable colours. Dalmatians with Patches, Blue eyes, Tri-colours or having lemon or orange spotting, should not be exhibited. Bronzing can occur during a "coating out" period. On the black spotted variety it is seen as a bronze tinge around the edges of the spots and/or on the surface of spots. Livers are affected similarly, the spots tending to develop a halo of gingery colour. Bronzing must be assessed in relation to the rest of the dog and should be considered similar to a coated breed being out of coat or having dropped coat temporarily.

    NOTE Male animals should have two apparently normal testicles fully descended into the scrotum.